Five Evergreen Animated Movies

animated movies of the year

Five Evergreen Animated Movies

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Some movies just never get old. Here are online casino au‘s most memorable animated films yet.

The Incredibles (2004)

Marvel and DC may own the superhero movie landscape, but in 2004, Pixar proved that you don’t need household names and company mascots to tell a compelling story about characters in tights. The Incredibles focuses on a family of superheroes, not unlike the Fantastic Four, that has to juggle their bizarre super powers while trying to live a normal life. The good folks at Pixar weren’t just satisfied with regurgitating the same superhero stories we’d seen over and over again, though; instead, they gave us a complex tale featuring superheroes facing domestication and worldwide threats. It’s sharp, funny, and, most importantly, it isn’t embarrassed of the genre it lovingly pays homage to. It’s more fun than The Dark Knight, smarter than The Avengers, and, overall, it’s one of the best superhero flicks to ever hit the screen.

Toy Story (1995)

In addition to opening the door for other classic movies from Pixar (such as The Incredibles and Monster’s Inc.), Toy Story’s witty script and groundbreaking images prompted many critics to call it the greatest animated film ever made. And not without reason—27 animators worked diligently on the film, illustrating every detail, down to each blade of grass, to tell the story of the misadventures of two lost toys trying to find their way home. However, Toy Story’s greatest achievement is its balance of nostalgia, childhood wonder, and misty-eyed adult humor. That’s the blend every kid’s movie aspires to.

Finding Nemo (2003)

Pixar studios has some of the best storytellers on their team, and each film they produce can tug your heart strings just as much as it can make you laugh like you’re six again. Centered around a story of love, courage and determination, Finding Nemo sends viewers through the ocean to bring a family back together. Coupled with hilarious characters, stellar animation, and a catchy soundtrack, Finding Nemo is still as popular today as it was during its initial release 16(!) years ago. You might just find its theme with games at best us online casino, as there are several of them.

The Lion King (1994)

Normally, kids don’t line up to see something that’s a mash-up of Hamlet and the Biblical tales of Joseph and Moses, but Disney made that happen with The Lion King. Props to Elton John for letting Disney introduce kids to heavier topics, like a beloved father getting trampled by a stampede of wildebeests. (We’re still not over it.)

The Lion King is one of the most heart-wrenching stories told through American animation, and a staple on the DVD shelves of families across the country. It broke new ground with its use of CGI animation, and went on to spawn one of the most popular Broadway musicals ever.

Wall-E (2008)

Ingeniously unfolding without dialogue, the Wall-E’s first scenes treat the post-apocalypse like a silent slapstick comedy, only the Little Tramp has been swapped out for a squat robot with expressive eye cams. Wall-E is a robot on Earth after its become Trash Planet, a garbage-strewn nightmare (and perhaps our future if we don’t shape up?). Wall-E compresses the world’s trash into tiny cubes using his chest compartment, and then creates epic pyramids of detritus—until he falls in love.

From there, the film transforms into something more conventional, though still beautiful and moving. True-story side bar: This writer was once a substitute teacher in a past life, and while subbing at middle school that used block scheduling, had to screen Wall-E for a number of classes. Because of the long class durations, the film would run in its entirety. After 48 hours had elapsed, I had seen Wall-E six times. The kids caused havoc while I was intermittently moved to the point right before the point where you’d say you were on the verge of tears watching Wall-E cry out for his beloved. Real talk.

 

Joel Miller
info@bleachexile.com
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